Wednesday, May 21, 2008

10 reasons unreasonable people succeed


It's amazing how inspiration arrives whenever I need it most. This is from The Nonprofit Times. I'm afraid it describes us to a 'T':


George Bernard Shaw wrote: “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world. The unreasonable man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”

It was this view that caused John Elkington and Pamela Hartigan to title their book The Power of Unreasonable People, in which they list in it the 10 characteristics of successful social enterprise that they have found among social entrepreneurs.

Those people:

  • Try to shrug off the constraints of ideology or discipline.
  • Identify and apply practical solutions to problems, combining innovation, resourcefulness and opportunity.
  • Innovate by finding a new product, service or approach to a social problem.
  • Focus first and foremost on social value creation and, in that spirit, are willing to share their innovations and insights for others to replicate.
  • Jump in before ensuring that they are fully resourced.
  • Have an unwavering belief in everyone’s innate capacity, often regardless of education, to contribute meaningfully to economic and social development.
  • Show a dogged determination that pushes them to take risks that others wouldn’t dare.
  • Balance their passion for change with the zeal to measure and monitor impact.
  • Have a great deal to teach change-makers in other sectors.
  • Display a healthy impatience.

2 comments:

Stacey Monk said...

It might be my turn to borrow from your blog. Thanks for sharing this; I hadn't seen it. And it makes me feel a lot more sane, despite what some perceive as my total lack of reason.

You are awesome and inspiring. I'm so glad to know a kindred unreasonable soul ;)

Jeane Goforth said...

Stacey,
Reason isn't everything! If we rate not just a list but a book, that's incredibly reassuring, eh? But we fit the list because we didn't need the list.
I keep investigating books like this only to decide I don't need to read a book ABOUT me, I need to read a book with ideas on where to go from here. Have you found any good resources?